Tuesday, May 24, 2016

The Streets of Cairo

I ended up having coffee in a cafe next to a souvenier shop and the whole time Egyptian girls were stopping by trying on the old fashions from way back when and taking selfies. Eventually these girls asked me if I would be in a photo with them. I clearly am underdressed! 

Friendly Faces in Cairo

The friendliness in Islamic Cairo was so great! I never wanted to leave! 

Friday, May 20, 2016

Photos from Egypt - May 2016

Last month I visited Egypt. These days tourists are mostly going elsewhere, which left it less crowded and perfect for me! I loved the bustle of the big city. I loved the uber friendliness of the people. And most of all, as a political person, I loved having conversations with everyone I met about the Arab Spring, Tahrir Square and Egypt's future. As an experiential learner, there is nothing better for me than seeing it and hearing it first hand.

Click HERE to see more photos from Egypt

Visiting the Giza Pyramids - the Last Surviving Wonder of the Ancient World

I was told by some that seeing the Egyptian Pyramids is a bit of a let down after seeing so many pictures and I wasn't sure what to expect. In one way, I think those people were right since I knew exactly what they looked like, so that wasn't quite as dramatic as I expected. Instead I think what was interesting was seeing in person something I have heard so much about in the past. When they pop up out of the Giza skyline I couldn't help but get excited. And although my attraction to Egypt at this time was that tourism was so far down and I was hoping to have the place to myself like I had read about, I think the fact that the main complex was actually really busy may have added to the experience. I arrived at the same time as at least 100 people dressed in neon green and their excitement reminded me what an unusual opportunity this was. The horses and camels for rent we moving all over the site and people were climbing everywhere and I just couldn't miss that this place was special. 

The best and most impressive part to me is that there are many pyramids in the valley. You can see them on the horizon from huge distances away. Some are soaring and some look more like piles of stones and they are all different sizes, but altogether they are quite a sight.

Thursday, May 19, 2016

The Shadows of Tahrir Square - Cairo, Egypt

Stencils like these of the protestors who were killed were all around the Tahrir Square area
Faces of the Arab Spring near Tahrir Square

The West's misunderstanding of Islam and Arab culture keeps hitting me. I need a better understanding of what people were fighting for in Tahrir Square and elsewhere. With a history of kings, pharaohs and dictators and from the perspective of people I have spoken to here, it's not clear to me that the majority wants to actively participate in governing and instead many mostly want to be able to live their lives safely with enough prosperity to take care of their families. They are not looking for "Democracy" like we believe in in the West. And frankly, with the rise of Trump in America, I don't even feel we are qualified to understand what Americans want so I certainly don't think we can lecture Egyptians about what they should want. 

What I hope for Egypt is that things stabilize and tourists come back while they also diversify their economy a bit more to not be so dependent on tourists. I hope Sisi really is a leader who is listening to everyone and guiding the country through tough important necessary change. Egyptians understand that change takes time. They have almost 5000 years of history to look back on. 

Tourism after the Arab Spring in Eygpt

Arriving in Egypt 12 hours before the mysterious Air Cairo flight disappearance was a rather surreal start to my trip.  In fact, I was the one who informed my tour guide that day it had happened and it looked like I punched him in the stomach. While the tourism numbers show about a 75% drop in tourism since the political uprising of 2011 and a continued sharp drop from last year to this year possibly because of the terrorist incident in the Sinai in the fall when a Russian airliner was taken down by ISIS, the government party line is that things look bright ahead and they were getting through the slump. In fact, almost everyone I have spoken to seems to feel that Egypt is stabilizing and Sisi is doing a good job running the country.  While there is still work to do I get the feeling things were looking up. (I realize that might be a targeted message for people like me.) But in a country where 12% of the population makes their livelihood from tourism this plane crash is a sign of more tough times ahead. 

Meanwhile I don't really know what is happening behind the scenes, but my tourist experience has been wonderful. Egyptians are open and friendly. Cairo is bright, busy and energetic. It's population of 20 million bursts out into the sidewalks of every neighborhood. Seeing the sites is easy. There are plenty of tour guides to teach me history and culture and to thankfully share their opinion on politics and Egypt today. The streets feel very safe. Jane Jacobs would like seeing all the "eyes on the street" that keep everyone safe and looked after. 

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Why I Travel

Many times the reason I go on a trip is because I need to revive my inner confidence. My real life has a way of beating me down and travel builds me back up. I need to boost my brave, adventurous core, so that I can face life's daily challenges at home. Travel makes me face different kinds of situations and not only survive but usually find possibility I didn't know existed. It reminds me the incredible benefits of an open mind. It shows me that just because I look at something one way, others see it differently and that helps me step back and get a larger, new perspective. It freshens me up and makes me a better, stronger person when I get home.

You Think I’m Weird Because I Travel Solo